FUNDAMENTALISM AMONG ACEHNESE YOUTH: ACEHNESE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ ATTITUDES ON RELIGIOUS FUNDAMENTALISM, RIGHT-WING AUTHORITARIANISM, AND MILITIA SENTIMENTS

Main Article Content

Alif Azadi Taufik
Farnanda .

Keywords

Aceh, Religious Fundamentalism, Right-Wing, Authoritarianism, Militia, Sentiments, Survey

Abstract


Purpose:This study aims to measure the attitude levels of Acehnese university students on religious fundamentalism, right-wing authoritarianism, and militia sentiments and determine whether there are strong correlations between these attitudes.


Methodology:A modified Islamic and Indonesian version of the Revised Religious Fundamentalism Scale, the Right-Wing Authoritarianism Scale, and the Militia Scale were employed in an online survey.The survey gathered 308 responses and 85 of them completed.


Results:Acehnese Muslims display a 69.3%, 54% and 58% attitude level of religious fundamentalism, right-wing authoritarianism, and militia sentiments respectively, displayingattitudes significantly higher than Toronto Muslims, Hindus, Jews, United States and Canadian Christians, and Ghanaian Christians and Muslims. Religious fundamentalist attitudes correlated 72% with right-wing authoritarian attitudes and 62%with militia sentiments. Right-wing authoritarianism correlated 61% with militia sentiments.


Implications:The findings of this study are useful in understanding the interlocking social relationships of religious fundamentalism, right-wing authoritarianism, and militia sentiments. Specifically, these findings indicate the challenges the Indonesian government still face in empowering democracy and restoring the central government’s legitimacy in Aceh.


Originality:This study adapts well-known scales into a unique Indonesian and Islamic context, providing a unique perspective in the discussion of religious fundamentalism, right-wing authoritarianism, and militia sentiments. It elucidates the unique personality of Acehnese youth, whom have been under studied.

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